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Marshall maude

“Clay, which is weathered and decomposed rock, is an amorphous material that invites the exploration of origin and finality."

 

Price Range: $1,800 to $8,900

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Marshall Maude

“I believe the most fundamental questions, those of origin and finality that humanity asks itself are unanswerable, yet this inquiry is central to every aspect of our lives. It is the quest to answer what remains unanswerable. With every discovery, new questions arise and the mysterious expands.

“This great paradox fascinates me and resides at the core of my work. I make ceramic sculpture that explores this paradox not to answer, but to illustrate in physical form the power and significance of inquiry itself. 

“Clay, which is weathered and decomposed rock, is an amorphous material that invites the exploration of origin and finality. Using this material and traditional ceramic technologies, practices, and objects as constants, I delve into a direct, visceral relationship with firing process, construction, and basic forms such as the slab and the vessel to re-contextualize them.

“Connections to the work of past makers, such as the amphoras of nameless Greek workmen or the tea bowls of Japanese masters, the blue-and-white paintings of Chinese Ming Dynasty decorators or the drawings of the Anasazi potters signify a continuum and an infinite timeline. I contrast ceramic history and processes with new technologies and ideas, not to challenge but to embrace. A reincarnation of concept, image, pattern, and form reinforce my intention to look again, as inquiry without answer.”    

 - Marshall Maude


Marshall Maude is a ceramic artist and Associate Professor of Ceramics at the University of Kansas. Maude has designed, built, and fired wood kilns around the world and exhibited his work in solo and group shows nationally and in China, Denmark, Korea, and New Zealand. In 2013, Marshall Maude was an artist-in-residence at the Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China, and in 2014, at Guldagergaard – International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark.