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Bruce Bowditch

“The whole cosmos, from the tiny atom to entire galaxies, display striking similarities. Images of rock, water, flame, wood, clouds, even outer space can be hard to distinguish from one another."

 

Price range: $550 to $2,400

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Bruce Bowditch

A worldwide background informed the artistic direction of artist Bruce Bowditch. After teenage years spent in Rome and studies at Parson’s School of Art in Paris as well as earning his MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Bowditch worked as an art director at multinational advertising agencies in Singapore and Australia for ten years. In 1998 he stepped off that path. Since then, Bowditch has lived the full-time life of being, simultaneously, a fine artist and a yoga teacher and author of five books on yoga. The figurative paintings he began with, which bore influences of the Italian Renaissance, gave way to a redefinition of his style into abstraction. His “acrylic flow” technique allows for, as he describes it, “a more free and expressive approach, offering the viewer an internal experience of movement and detail.”

Having come from a family that, while supportive of his artistic ambitions, nevertheless frowned upon abstract art, Bowditch discovered that this new approach offered him a spontaneous emotional and even spiritual connection to painting that he had not previously experienced. He had spent most of his life as a keen observer of the themes that occur throughout nature and, as he points out, “The whole cosmos, from the tiny atom to entire galaxies, display striking similarities. Images of rock, water, flame, wood, clouds, even outer space can be hard to distinguish from one another. The similarities between the shape and patterns of bone, and the currents in the sea and sky are uncanny.”

The abstract paintings Bowditch creates represent his joy “in discovering a technique that naturally lends itself to expressing the universal flow that weaves through and around us in a spectacular dance.”

To create one of these captivating paintings, Bowditch admittedly uses a lot of paint. He paints on rigid, canvas-covered wood panels that hold the paint well while he works. “Depending on how I wish the paint to move, I use various additional mediums that create various effects. After the layers of paint are applied to a panel, I manipulate the surfaces with a variety of tools, anything from plastic picnic plates to tooth picks to plain old gravity. Sometimes I’ll paint back into the surface with a brush once it’s dry.”

Bowditch works alone in his studio three to four days a week. There is always prep work: the making of panels, stretching canvas, planning color. Then the selecting and blending of pigments and mediums. As he begins painting, Bowditch gives each painting his full attention until it is complete. In the curing or drying times necessary as he proceeds through the creation of each painting Bowditch finds that his yoga, his writing and his family all provide him with, as he puts it, “blessedly full weeks.”